About Ché Finch

                                                                         

 

South African born, Contemporary British artist, Ché Finch creates autobiographical hand-coiled vases and ceramic paintings, exploring a dialogue with memory. “I love the intimacy of working with clay and the ambiguity that glazes lend my work”.

Ché is also co-founder of several arts organisations, providing a platform for artists in the North West.

Contact

                                                             

 

 

chesvases@gmail.com | 07486 696420

© Copyright Ché Finch 2019

All rights reserved.

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Mocha Diffusion

Artwork Details
 
Artist: Ché Finch
Date: 2019
Medium: Stoneware, glazes, oxides and stains
Dimensions: 12 x 10 cm
Purchase:  £195  Available to purchase through the artist.

© Ché Finch

Summary

Mocha Diffusion is an experimental piece exploring a new palette and technique in Ché Finch's work. Whilst not typical 'visually speaking' of mocha diffusion techniques, the piece demonstrates you can use an old technique in new ways. This piece has been bisque fired, without a final stoneware firing in order to retain the colour vibrancy.

Mocha Diffusion represents the visual leap that is born from a period of withdrawal from the 'physical' making processes of art. Representing a fusion of established techniques alonside newer research and exploration into mocha diffusion.

'Most of my work is born from personal experience which can be reactive, emotional, cathartic and often times exhausting. When I'm not physically making work, this allows my mind and visual information to relax and flex, which I believe in turn fosters artistic growth... the brain is given time and space to process the visuals when it's allowed to just take time from the physicality of creating artwork. I think it's no mistake that having a substantial rest from 'physically' creating art that my work has evolved further.  Artists never truly relax in their head, they're always assessing and reworking images in their minds eye, but when an artist allows themselves some physical creative space they stop treading a well worn groove  and create conditions for artistic growth. 

Taking a break is part of being a creative, the well worn groove is production, not necessarily art'.